7 Li Fil Bibliography

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General Works

Articles/Books About Individual Plays

General Works

"Adaptation and the literary film."
Screen;SO: Vol.XLIII nr.1 (Spring 2002); p.1-73
UC users only
"A special section on film adaptation. From very different points of view, the essays presented in this section suggest possible approaches to issues of language and figuration, as well as issues of history, memory, and the national past, which can be more articulated than in traditional critical writing on adaptation. The writers base their discussions on the analysis of movies within their specific signifying practices, and their historical and national contexts. In doing so, they begin to draw a more detailed map of this landscape and to trace new and productive ways of reconnecting cinema and literature. Articles examine adaptations of literary works in Martin Scorsese's and Terence Davies's The Age of Innocence and The House of Mirth, respectively; two Indian adaptations of William Shakespeare's Hamlet; the particular performances of female movie stars Emma Thompson, Kate Winslet, and Gwyneth Paltrow; and the reception of Claire Denis's movie, Beau Travail, as a loose adaptation of Herman Melville 1891 novella, Billy Budd, Sailor." [Art Index]

Aebischer, Pascale
Shakespeare's violated bodies : stage and screen performance Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2004.
MAIN: PR3069.B58 A68 2004
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/cam032/2003055765.html

Albanese, Denise
"The Shakespeare film and the Americanization of culture." In: Marxist Shakespeares / edited by Jean E. Howard and Scott Cutler Shershow. London ; New York : Routledge, 2001. Accents on Shakespeare.
Main Stack PR3024.M39 2001

Aldama, Frederick Luis.
"Race, cognition, and emotion: Shakespeare on film." College Literature 33.1 (Wntr 2006): 197(17).
UC users only

Almost Shakespeare: reinventing his works for cinema and television
Edited by James R. Keller and Leslie Stratyner. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2004.
MAIN: PR3093 .A46 2004
PFA : PR3093 .A46 2004
Contents: Introduction / James R. Keller and Leslie Stratyner -- The politics of culture : the play's the thing / Patrick Finn -- Imitation as originality in Gus van Sant's My own private Idaho / Andrew Barnaby -- Shakespeare transposed : the British stage on the post-colonial screen / Parmita Kapadia -- Suture, Shakespeare, and race, or, What is our cultural debt to the bard? / Ayanna Thompson -- Cinema in the round : self-reflexivity in Tim Blake Nelson's O / Eric C. Brown -- Sex, lies, videotape-and Othello / R.S. White -- The time is out of joint : Withnail and I and historical melancholia, or, Camberwell carrots and Shakespeare / Aaron Kelly and David Salter -- Horatio : the first CSI / Jody Malcolm -- Teen scenes : recognizing Shakespeare in teen film / Ariane M. Balizet -- An aweful rule : safe schools, hard canons, and Shakespeare's loose heirs / Melissa J. Jones -- Prospero's pharmacy : Peter Greenaway and the critics play Shakespeare's mimetic game / Dan DeWeese -- Shakespeare film and television derivatives : a bibliography / Jose Ramon Diaz Fernandez.

Anderegg, Michael A.
Cinematic Shakespeare Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield, c2004.
MAIN: PR3093 .A525 2004

Anderegg, Michael A.
Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and popular culture / Michael Anderegg. New York: Columbia University Press, c1999. Series title: Film and culture.
UCB Main PR3093 .A53 1999
Contents via Google books

Anderegg, Michael A.
"Welles/Shakespeare/film: an overview." Film adaptation / edited and with an introduction by James Naremore.p. 154-71 New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2000. Rutgers depth of field series.
Main Stack PN1997.85.F55 2000

Apocalyptic Shakespeare : essays on visions of chaos and revelation in recent film adaptations
Edited by Melissa Croteau and Carolyn Jess-Cooke. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .A56 2009

Ball, Robert Hamilton
"The Shakespeare Film as Record: : Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree." Shakespeare Quarterly 3:3 (1952:July) 227
UC users only

Ball, Robert Hamilton
"Shakespeare in One Reel." The Quarterly of Film Radio and Television, Vol. 8, No. 2. (Winter, 1953), pp. 139-149.
UC users only

Ball, Robert Hamilton
Shakespeare on Silent Film; a Strange Eventful History. New York, Theater Arts Books [1968].
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .B3 1968

Ball, Robert Hamilton
Shakespeare on Silent Film: A Strange Eventful History. London, Allen & Unwin, 1968.
UCB Main PR3093 .B3 1968

Bowman, James.
"Bard to Death." (film adaptations of the works of William Shakespeare) American Spectator v29, n3 (March, 1996):58 (2 pages).

Bristol, Michael D.
Big-time Shakespeare / Michael D. Bristol. London ; New York : Routledge, 1996.
Main Stack PR2976.B658 1996
Contents via Google Books

Brode, Douglas
Shakespeare in the movies: from the silent era to Shakespeare in love / Douglas Brode. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.B76 2000

Buchman, Lorne Michael.
Still in Movement: Shakespeare on Screen / Lorne M. Buchman. New York:Oxford University Press, 1991.
UCB Main PR3093 .B8 1991
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .B8 1991

Buhler, Stephen M.
"Antic Dispositions: Shakespeare and Steve Martin's L. A. Story." Shakespeare Yearbook, 1997, 8, 212-29.

Buhler, Stephen M.
Shakespeare in the cinema : ocular proof / Stephen M. Buhler. Albany: State University of New York Press, c2002. SUNY series, cultural studies in cinema/video.
UCB Main PR3093.B84 2002
Contens via Google Books

Buhler, Stephen M.
"Text, Eyes, and Videotape: Screening Shakespeare Scripts." Shakespeare Quarterly, vol. 46 no. 2. 1995 Summer. pp: 236-44.

Bulman, James C.
"The BBC Shakespeare and "House Style."" Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 35, No. 5, Special Issue:Teaching Shakespeare. (1984), pp. 571-581.
(UC Berkeley users only)

Bulman, J.C. and H.R. Coursen.
Shakespeare on Television: An Anthology of Essays and Reviews. Hanover: University Press of New England,1988.
UCB Main PR3093 .S54 1988
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .S54 1988

Burnett, Mark Thornton.
Filming Shakespeare in the global marketplace Basingstoke [England] ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
MAIN: PR3093 .B87 2007; View current status of this item
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0727/2006050833-t.html

Burt, Richard; Newstok, Scott L.
"Certain Tendencies in Criticism of Shakespeare on Film. Shakespeare Studies, 2010, Vol. 38, p88-103, 16p
(UC Berkeley users only)

Burt, Richard.
"The Love That Dare Not Speak Shakespeare's Name: New Shakesqueer Cinema." In: Shakespeare, the Movie: Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, and Video/ edited by Lynda E. Boose, Richard Burt. pp: 240-68. London; New York: Routledge, 1997.
Main Stack PR3093.S545 1997

Burt, Richard
"Slammin' Shakespeare in Acc(id)ents Yet Unknown: Liveness, Cinem(edi)a, and RacialDis-Integration." Shakespeare Quarterly. 53(2):201-26. 2002 Summer
UC users only

The Cambridge companion to Shakespeare on film
Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PR3093 .C36 2000
Contents via Google Books

Camp, Gerald M.
"Shakespeare on Film." Journal of Aesthetic Education 3:1 (1969:Jan.) 107
UC users only

Cartmell, Deborah.
Interpreting Shakespeare on screen / Deborah Cartmell. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire : Macmillan, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.C37 2000
Contents via Google Books

Charnes, Linda.
"Dismember Me: Shakespeare, Paranoia, and the Logic of Mass Culture."Shakespeare Quarterly, vol. 48 no. 1. 1997.pp: 1-16.

Charney, Maurice
"Shakespearean Anglophilia: The BBC-TV Series and American Audiences Shakespearean Anglophilia: The BBC-TV Series and American Audiences." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 31, No. 2 (Summer, 1980), pp. 287-292
UC users only

Chedgzoy, Kate.
Shakespeare's Queer Children: Sexual Politics and Contemporary Culture / Kate Chedgzoy. Manchester; New York: Manchester University Press; New York: Distributed exclusively in the USA and Canada by St. Martin's Press, 1995.
Main Stack PR3024.C48 1995

Clayton, Bertram.
"Shakespeare and the Talkies" The English Review, n. 49, 1929

Collick, John.
Shakespeare, Cinema, and Society / John Collick. Manchester; New York: Manchester University Press; New York: Distributed in the USA and Canada by St. Martin's Press, c1989. Series title: Cultural politics.
UCB Main PR3093 .C641 1989
UCB Moffitt PR3093 C64 1989

Colón Semenza, Gregory M.
"Teens, Shakespeare, and the Dumbing Down Cliché: The Case of The Animated Tales." Shakespeare Bulletin, Summer2008, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p37-68, 32p
UC users only

Combs, Richard; Durgnat, Raymond
"Shakespeare: a chaos theory." Film Comment v 37 no4 July/Aug 2001. p. 56-61
UC users only
"The writers discuss modern film adaptations of William Shakespeare's plays. Contemporary interpretations of Shakespeare always appear to to contain an element of parody. This parody, explicit or implicit, is part of the message, the zeitgeist, the problem of perspective that each of these adaptations has to tackle: Four centuries of worship have positioned Shakespeare as the preeminent creative force of English literature and have dustily confined him to the classroom as far as a modern young cinema audience is concerned. Al Pacino credits Kenneth Branagh's 1989 Henry V with transforming the market for Shakepeare, but it was 1998's Shakepeare in Love that made the author a star." [Art Index]

A concise companion to Shakespeare on screen
Edited by Diana E. Henderson. Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2006.
MAIN: PR3093 .C65 2006
MOFF: PR3093 .C65 2006; View current status of this item
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip059/2005006592.html

Cook, Hardy M.
"Jane Howell's BBC First Tetralogy: Theatrical and Televisual Manipulation." (British Broadcasting Corp.) (Shakespeare - Film &Television) Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n4 (Oct, 1992):326 (6 pages).
UC users only

Cooke-Jess, Carolyn.
""The promised end" of cinema: portraits of cinematic apocalypse in 21st century Shakespearean cinema.(William Shakespeare)." Literature-Film Quarterly 34.2 (April 2006): 161(8).
UC users only

Corliss, Richard.
"Suddenly Shakespeare." (new movies based on works by William Shakespeare) Time v148, n21 (Nov 4, 1996):88 (3 pages).

Coursen, Herbert R.
Shakespeare in production: whose history? / by H.R. Coursen. Athens: Ohio University Press, 1996.
UCB Main PR3091 .C675 1996

Coursen, Herbert R.
Shakespeare in space: recent Shakespeare productions on screen / H.R. Coursen New York: Peter Lang, c2002. Studies in Shakespeare; vol. 14
Main Stack PR3093.C67 2002

Coursen, Herbert R.
Shakespearean Performance as Interpretation / H.R. Coursen. Newark: University of Delaware Press; London: Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, c1992.
UCB Main PR3091 .C68 1992

Coursen, Herbert R.
Shakespeare: the two traditions / H.R. Coursen. Madison [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c1999.
UCB Main PR3100 .C68 1999

Coursen, Herbert R.
Shakespeare translated : derivatives on film and TV New York : Peter Lang, c2005.
MAIN: PR3093 .C675 2005
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip054/2004027476.html

Coursen, Herbert R.
Teaching Shakespeare with film and television: a guide / H.R. Coursen. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1997.
UCB Main PR2987 .C68 1997

Coursen, Herbert R.
Watching Shakespeare on Television / H.R. Coursen. Rutherford [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, c1993.
UCB Main PR3093 .C68 1993
Contents via Google Books

Crowdus, Gary
"Shakespeare is up to date: an interview with Sir IanMcKellan." Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter,1998):46 (2 pages).
UC users only
"Part of a special section on film adaptations of plays by William Shakespeare. An interview with Shakespearean actor Sir Ian McKellen. McKellen, who has enacted many of the major Shakespearean roles, has long been known as an advocate of updating the playwright's work. In the interview, he discusses a range of topics regarding the adaptation of Shakespeare for the screen, including his 1995 film adaptation Richard III, the choice of seasoned Shakespearean actors for Richard III because they can deliver the lines with the rhythm of contemporary speech, and his appreciation of Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet because it was a film rather than a filmed play." [Art Index]

Crowdus, Gary
"Sharing an enthusiasm for Shakespeare: an interview with Kenneth Branagh." Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):34 (8 pages).
UC users only
"Part of a special section on film adaptations of plays by William Shakespeare. An interview with actor and filmmaker Kenneth Branagh. If any one filmmaker can be considered to be responsible for the current renaissance of film production of plays by Shakespeare, it is Branagh. Branagh discusses several topics in the interview, including his feeling that filming Hamlet invited a more strongly interpretive approach to the central character's inner life than he would take in the theater, his experience that the delivery of rhyming text requires a lightness of touch that is achieved a little more easily in cinema than in the theater, and his experience of being directed in Oliver Parker's Othello." [Art Index]

Crowdus, Gary.
"Words, words, words: recent Shakespearean films."Cineaste v23, n4 (Fall, 1998):13 (7 pages).
UC users only
"Recent Shakespearean films are discussed. The main challenge facing any filmmaker adapting Shakespeare is how to deal with the language, through which he delighted popular audiences with his poetic gifts and playful use of words. The usual response is to cut it, but what is more relevant than what is removed is the particular interpretation of the material that results, as well as the creative decisions made in performance and presentation. Being layered with complexities and ambiguities, the plays lend themselves to varying interpretations and meanings, and, although most filmmakers would be nervous about adding words to Shakespeare, there is no resistance to adding visual imagery to compensate for cuts or to embellish a particular interpretation. The writer goes on to discuss Oliver Parker's Othello, Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet, Al Pacino's Looking for Richard, Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet, and Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night, or What You Will." [Art Index]

Crowl, Samuel.
"Communicating Shakespeare: An Interview with Kenneth Branagh." Shakespeare Bulletin: a Journal of Performance Criticism & Scholarship. 20(3):24-28. 2002 Summer

Crowl, Samuel.
Shakespeare at the cineplex : the Kenneth Branagh era Athens : Ohio University Press, c2003.
MAIN: PR3093 .C75 2003
MOFF: PR3093 .C75 2003;

Crowl, Samuel.
Shakespeare observed: studies in performance on stage and screen / Samuel Crowl. Athens : Ohio University Press, c1992.
Main Stack PR3093.C76 1992

Davies, Anthony
Filming Shakespeare's Plays: The Adaptations of Laurence Olivier, Orson Welles, Peter Brook, and Akira Kurosawa / Anthony Davies. Cambridge [Cambridgshire]; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988.
UCB Main PR3093 .D381 1988
UCB Moffitt PR3093 D38 1988
Contents via Google books
Contens via Google Books

Daileader, Celia R.
"Nude Shakespeare in film and nineties popular feminism." In: Shakespeare and sexuality / edited by Catherine M.S. Alexander, Stanley Wells. Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
Main Stack PR3069.S45.S53 2001

Daz-Fernandez, Jose Ramon.
"Shakespeare on screen: a bibliography of critical studies." Post Script (17:1) 1997, 91-146.
UC users only

Daz-Fernandez, Joso Ramon.
"Orson Welles's Shakespeare Films: An Annotated Checklist." Shakespeare Bulletin: A Journal of Performance Criticism and Scholarship, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 113-36, Spring 2005.

De, Esha Niyogi
"Modern Shakespeares in popular Bombay cinema: translation, subjectivity and community." Screen v. 43 no. 1 (Spring 2002) p. 19-40
UC users only
"Part of a special section on film adaptation. Two Urdu adaptations of British Shakespearean works produced in the late-colonial and early-independence periods in India generated a hybrid art of filmmaking. The movies in question are Sohrab Modi's 1935 Hamlet alias Khoon ka Khoon, which was an adaptation of contemporary British stage productions of the eponymous play, and Kishore Sahu's 1954 Hamlet, which was a shot-by-shot reproduction of Laurence Olivier's 1948 eponymous adaptation. Their makers obviously copied the British sources and profited from the desire inculcated in English-educated producers and consumers to amass cultural capital, but they also interwove traditional narrative and cinematic techniques in these imitations. A "reflexive awareness" of the commonalities between the respective conceptual frameworks, and of their incommensurable differences, resulted from the filmmakers' efforts to reconcile contrasting worldviews, creating a hybrid of European texts as well as of the very notion of translation as the derivation of European models." [Art Index]

Dixon, Wheeler.
"The 'Performing Self' in Filmed Shakespearean Drama." Shakespeare Bulletin 5, no. 4 (1987): 18-19.
Suggests that alhough there is something lost in any filmic translation of a stage drama, there is also something to be gained--a final formalizing of the actor-audience relationship. Discusses, for example, Laurence Olivier's Richard III, Hamlet, and Henry V; Orson Welles's Macbeth; Roman Polanski's Macbeth; Stuart Burge's Julius Caesar; Robert Burton's and Nicol Williamson's Hamlet; and Peter Brook's King Lear

Donaldson, Peter Samuel
"'All which it inherit': Shakespeare, globes and global media." Shakespeare survey 52. Cambridge Univ. Press, 1999. p. 183-200.

Donaldson, Peter Samuel
Shakespearean Films/Shakespearean Directors / Peter S. Donaldson.Boston: Unwin Hyman, 1990.Series title: Media and popular culture
UCB Main PR3093 .D66 1990
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .D66 1990

Eckert, Charles W.
Focus on Shakespearean Films. Edited by Charles W. Eckert. EnglewoodCliffs, N.J., Prentice-Hall [1972]. Series title: Film focus. Series title: A Spectrum book.
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .E3

Fedderson, Kim; Richardson, J. Michael.
"Praising and Burying the Bard: Epideictic Dilemmas in Recent Adaptationsof Shakespeare." In: Relocating praise: literary modalities and rhetorical contexts / edited by Alice G. den Otter. pp: 119-27. Toronto: Canadian Scholars' Press, 2000.
Main Stack PN80.5.R44 2000

"Film adaptations of Shakespeare's works."(Editorial) Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):1 (1 page).
The film industry's renewed interest in Shakespeare returns his works tothe masses. Although Shakespeare had been an important part of popularculture during his own time, as well as in 18th- and 19th-century America,socioeconomic factors combined to transform him in the late 1900s into aelitist cultural figure whose works were shown only in 'legitimate'theaters and seen only by the upper class. The recent slew of filmadaptations of Shakespeare provides an opportunity for ordinary people toappreciate his plays.

Fisher, Bob.
"Tragedy of Epic Proportions." American Cinematographer v. 78 (Jan. '97) p. 58-60+.

French, Emma.
Selling Shakespeare to Hollywood : the marketing of filmed Shakespeare adaptations from 1989 into the new millennium Hatfield [England] : University of Hertfordshire Press, 2006.
MAIN: PN1995.9.M29 F74 2006

Friedmna, Michael D.
"Introduction: "To think o' th' teen that I have turned you to': The Scholarly Consideration of Teen Shakespeare Films."" Shakespeare Bulletin, Summer2008, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p1-7, 7p
UC users only

Gates, David.
"Shakespeare: Dead White Male of the Year."(continuing popularity of theworks of William Shakespeare) Newsweek v128, n27 (Dec 30, 1996):82 (6 pages).
The study of Shakespeare has been dropped from many school curriculums, buthis popularity continues virtually unabated and his works continue to beproduced around the world. For example, in New York City before Christmas1996 three new Shakespeare films were showing, with another to open onChristmas.

Gielgud, John, Sir
Shakespeare: Hit or Miss? / John Gielgud with John Miller. London:Sidgwick & Jackson, 1991.
UCB Moffitt PN2598.G45 A3 1991

Griffin, Alice
"Shakespeare Through the Camera's Eye: III Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 7, No. 2. (Spring, 1956), pp.235-240.
UC users only

Griffin, Alice
"Shakespeare through the Camera's Eye: IV." Alice V. GriffinShakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 17, No. 4. (Autumn, 1966), pp.383-387.
UC users only

Griffin, Alice
"Shakespeare Through the Camera's Eye--Julius Caesar in Motion Pictures; Hamlet and Othello on Television." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 4, No. 3. (Jul., 1953), pp.331-336.
(Berkeley users only)

Grindley, Carl James.
"'We're Everyone You Depend On': Filming Shakespeare's Peasants." In: Shakespeare and the Middle Ages : essays on the performance and adaptation of the plays with medieval sources or settings / edited by Martha W. Driver and Sid Ray ; foreword by Michael Almereyda and Dakin Matthews. Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3069.M47 S54 2009

Gronsky, Daniel
"Shakespeare in Translation: Foreign Film Versions of Shakespeare's Plays." Film International # 11 / 2004:5

Guneratne, Anthony R.
Shakespeare, film studies, and the visual cultures of modernity / Anthony R. Guneratne. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .G86 2008

Hamilton Ball, Robert
"On Shakespeare Filmography" Literature/Film Quarterly 1:4 (1973:Fall) 299
UC users only

Hardison, O. B.
"Shakespeare on Film: The Developing Canon." PCLS, vol. 12. 1981. pp: 131-145.

Hatchuel, Sarah.
Shakespeare : from stage to screen / Sarah Hatchuel. Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Full-text available online (UCB users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3093 .H37 2004
Pacific Film Archive PR3093 .H37 2004

Hirsch, Foster.
Laurence Olivier / Foster Hirsch. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1979. Series title: Twayne's theatrical arts series.
UCB Main PN2598.O55 .H5
UCB Moffitt PN2598.O55 .H5

Hatchuel, Sarah.
Shakespeare : from stage to screen Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Full-text of this book available online via ebrary [UC Berkeley users only]
MAIN: PR3093 .H37 2004
PFA : PR3093 .H37 2004
Contents via Google Books

Holderness, Graham.
"Radical potentiality and institutional closure: Shakespeare in film and television." In: Political Shakespeare: essays in cultural materialism / edited by Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield. 2nd ed. pp: 182-201. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994.
Main Stack PR3017.P59 1994

Holderness, Graham.
"Shakespeare Rewound." Shakespeare Survey v45 (Annual, 1993):63 (12 pages).
The adaptation of Shakespearean drama into film is analyzed. Results showthat the main difficulty in capturing the essence of the text intofilm-text is in the simultaneous and overlapping textual planes of WilliamShakespeare's plays. Experimental films have attempted to duplicate this byprojecting each scene on three screans to represent a visual image fromthree perspectives. Others have attempted deconstructive techniques andformal montage.

Homan, Sidney
"A Cinema for Shakespeare." Literature/Film Quarterly 4:2 (1976:Spring) 17
UC users only

Howlett, Kathy M.
Framing Shakespeare on filmAthens: Ohio University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PR3093 .H69 2000

DISSERTATION
Hurtgen, Charles Livermore.
Film Adaptations of Shakespeare's Plays / by Charles Livermore Hurtgen.1962.
NRLFC 2 944 442

Hulbert, Jennifer.
Shakespeare and youth culture / Jennifer Hulbert, Kevin J. Wetmore, Jr., and Robert L. York. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR2976 .H48 2006

Hurtgen, Charles Livermore
"The Operatic Character of Background Music in Film Adaptations of Shakespeare"Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 20, No. 1. (Winter, 1969), pp.53-64.
(UCB users only)

"The Inaccessible Bard." (Shakespeare film adaptions) Economist v342, n8004 (Feb 15, 1997):81 (2 pages).
Film adaptions of Shakespeare reached their nadir with the recent releaseof the truly horrible 'Tromeo and Juliet,' but dubious productions of theBard in both stage and screen have a long history. Problems even the mostgifted directors have in producing Shakespeare are examined.

Iyengar, Sujata.
"Shakespeare in HeteroLove." Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 122-27.
UCB users only

Jackson, Russell
"Shakespeare and the Cinema." In: The Cambridge companion to Shakespeare / edited by Margreta de Grazia and Stanley Wells. pp: 217-33. Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Series title: Cambridge companions to literature.
UCB Main PR2894 .C33 2001

Jackson, Russell
"Working with Shakespeare: confessions of an adviser." Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):42 (3pages).
UC users only
A historical adviser on Shakespearean productions describes hiswork. He served as 'text' adviser on three film adaptations of Shakespeare by Kenneth Branagh, on Oliver Parker's 'Othello' and on John Madden's'Shakespeare in Love.' He has also served as a consultant on stage and radioproductions of Shakespeare. His work entails assessing how the original Shakespearean text has been changed and suggesting where to add or take outportions of the text. He does this while also considering the point of view ofthe screenwriter.

Jess-Cooke, Carolyn
Shakespeare on film : such things as dreams are made of London ; New York : Wallflower, 2007.
MAIN: PR3093 .J47 2007

Jorgens, Jack J.
Shakespeare on Film / Jack J. Jorgens. Bloomington: Indiana UniversityPress, c1977.
UCB Main PR3093 .J6
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .J6

Jorgens, Jack J.
"Shakespeare on film and television." In: William Shakespeare: his world, his work, his influence / John F. Andrews, editor. pp: 681-703. New York: Scribner, c1985.
Main Stack PR2976.W5354 1985 p.

Juan Gil, Daniel
"Avant-garde Technique and the Visual Grammar of Sexuality in Orson Welles's Shakespeare Films." Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. [no pagination], Fall 2005

Kachur, B.A.
"The First Shakespeare Film: A Reconsideration and Reconstruction of Tree's 'King John.'"(Beerbohm Tree) Theatre Survey v32, n1 (May, 1991):43 (21 pages).
"Considers the actors, scenery, costumes, sites, and cinemagraphic techniques used in British director Herbert Beerbohm Tree's production of King John (1899), the first Shakespearean play to be filmed. Pays particular attention to the numerous contemporary periodicals used to reconstruct the history of this film." [Historical Abstracts]

Kingsley-Smith, Jane E.
"Shakesperean authorship in popular British cinema." (Critical Essay) Literature-Film Quarterly July 2002 v30 i3 p158(8)
UC users only
"'The Immortal Gentleman,' 'Time Flies,' and 'Shakespeare in Love' are 20th-century motion pictures portraying William Shakespeare as struggling with inspiration. Questions of Shakespeare as author of the plays with which he is identified and the possibility of his work having been collaborative are raised in these movies but ultimately resolved in his favor.' [Expanded Academic Index]

Lake, James H.
"Auteurial Control of Audience Response in Some Film Adaptations of Shakespearean Tragedy."Shakespeare Bulletin: a Journal of Performance Criticism & Scholarship. 16(3):33-35. 1998 Summer

Lamm, Zachary
" The Cinematic Shrews of Teen Comedy: Gendering Shakespeare in Twentieth-Century Film." Genders; 2009, Issue 49, p1-1, 1p
UC users only

Lan, Yong-Li.
"Returning to Naples: Seeing the End in Shakespeare Film Adaptation." Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 128-34.
UCB users only
Lane, Anthony
"Shakespeare on Film." In: Nobody's perfect : writings from the New Yorker / Anthony Lane. New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2002.
Full-text available online (UC Berkeley users only)
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1995 .L28 2002

Lane, Anthony.
"Tights! Camera! Action! What Does it Mean that the Bard Recently Hit No.1 at the Box Office?"(film adaptations of Shakespearean plays) New Yorker v72, n36 (Nov 25, 1996):65 (11 pages).
William Shakespeare' plays have been vehicles for films since the earlyhistory of the motion picture industry. An overview of these adaptions andassessments of the new 'Romeo and Juliet' and of Al Pacino's 'Looking forRichard' are presented.

Lanier, Douglas M.
"Recent Shakespeare Adaptation and the Mutations of Cultural Capital." Shakespeare Studies, 2010, Vol. 38, p104-113, 10p
UC users only

Lanier, Douglas M.
"Shakescorp noir." (Screen Shakespeare)(Critical Essay)Shakespeare Quarterly, Summer 2002 v53 i2 p157(24)
UC users only
"The rise of Shakespeare-based motion pictures in the 1990s may be seen as an attempt to reconfigure the relationship between traditional literature, multinational media industries, global economic capital and celebrity culture. This proliferation should not obscure the concept of film as a pervasive culture industry closely linked to coporate capitalism." [Expanded Academic Index]

Lanier, Douglas
"World-Wide Shakespeares: Local Appropriations in Film and Performance." Shakespeare Quarterly. Winter 2007. Vol. 58, Iss. 4; p. 562 (5 pages)

Lehmann, Courtney
"Crouching Tiger, Hidden Agenda: How Shakespeare and the Renaissance Are Taking the Rage Out of Feminism." Shakespeare Quarterly - Volume 53, Number 2, Summer 2002
UC users only

Lehmann, Courtney
"Kenneth Branagh at the Quilting Point: Shakespearean Adaptation, Postmodern Auteurism, and the (Schizophrenic) Fabric of 'Everyday Life'"Post Script - Essays in Film and the Humanities 17:1 [Fall 1997] p.6-27
UC users only
"Offers an analysis of the film adaptation of Shakespeare's "Henry V" by the actor-director Kenneth Branagh and discusses how his dual identity as an Irishman and as an Englishman has influenced his aesthetic philosophy toward the production of Shakespeare. Argues that this "schizophrenic" aspect of Branagh's cultural heritage informs his merging of the "high" culture of Shakespeare with the "low" cultural form of film and is indicative of art during the postmodern age." [International Index to the Performing Arts]

Lehmann, Courtney.
Shakespeare remains: theater to film, early modern to postmodern Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2002.
MAIN: PR3093 .L45 2002
Contens via Google Books

Lehmann, Courtney.
"Brave New Bard." (best books on Shakespeare in the movies)(Critical Essay) Cineaste v26, n1 (Winter, 2000):62.

Leonard, Kendra Preston.
Shakespeare, madness, and music : scoring insanity in cinematic adaptations / Kendra Preston Leonard Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2009.
Music ML80.S5 L43 2009

Literatur in Film und Fernsehen: von Shakespeare bis Beckett
Herbert Grabes (Hg.).Konigstein/Ts.: Scriptor, 1980.
MAIN: PN1997.85 .L49 1980

London, Todd.
"Shakespeare in a strange land." (theater and motion picture versions ofShakespeare's works) American Theatre v15, n6 (July-August, 1998):22 (8 pages).
Most theater and motion picture production groups have presented some ofShakespeare's works in a way that makes it easier for people to understandthem. However, a review of modern theater renditions and film adaptationsof Shakespearean works during the early 1998 showed that they have onlyundermined some values for appreciating Shakespeare's plays. These filmadaptations include Al Pacino's 'Looking for Richard' and Joe Calarco's'Romeo and Juliet.'

Lyons, Donald.
"Lights, Camera, Shakespeare." Commentary, vol. 103 no. 2. 1997 Feb. pp: 57-60.

Manvell, Roger
Shakespeare and the Film. New York, Praeger [1971].
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .M3

Manvell, Roger
Shakespeare and the Film / Roger Manvell. Rev. and updated. SouthBrunswick, N.J.: A. S. Barnes, 1979.
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .M3 1979

Marder, Louis.
"The Shakespeare film: facts and problems." Shakespeare Newsletter (Univ. of Illinois at ChicagoCircle) (23) 42, 49. 1973

McGuire, Philip C.
Speechless Dialect: Shakespeare's Open Silences / Philip C. McGuire.Berkeley: University of California Press, c1985.
UCB Main PR3091 .M27 1985

McKernan, Luke.
"Beerbohm Tree's King John rediscovered: the first Shakespeare film, September 1899." Shakespeare Bulletin (11:1) 1993,35-6; (11:2) 1993, 49-50.
UC users only

McLean, Andrew M.
Shakespeare, Annotated Bibliographies and Media Guide for Teachers /Andrew M. McLean. Urbana, Ill.: National Council of Teachers of English,c1980.
NRLFB 3 494 435

Meier, Paul.
"Kenneth Branagh: With Utter Clarity." (Interview) TDR (Cambridge, Mass.) v41, n2 (Summer, 1997):82 (8 pages).
Kenneth Branagh has directed film versions of 'Henry V' and 'Much Ado AboutNothing' and is credited with making the works of Shakespeare accessible toa new generation. He was interviewed on Oct 30, 1995, just before he beganproduction of the film version of 'Hamlet.' He explained that he tries toachieve a balance between imaginative interpretation and faithfulness tothe text. During rehearsals, he often provides background information aboutthe characters and time period, but encourages actors to add their ownpersonal response to the language. Branagh also discussed aesthetics,meter, famous Shakespearean actors and other topics.

Melnikoff, Kirk (ed. and introd.)
"Orson Welles and Shakespeare on Film." Shakespeare Bulletin: A Journal of Performance Criticism and Scholarship, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 5-136, Spring 2005.

Melkinoff, Kirk
"Wartime Shakespeare: The Strange Case of Bataan (1943)." Literature Film Quarterly; 2007, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p129-139, 11p
UC users only
"The article endeavors to examine Hollywood films between 1934 and 1943 that incorporate elements of Shakespearean drama into their narrative. The author focuses on the film "Bataan," a World War II combat film that uses elements of "Hamlet" and "Macbeth." A connection between "Bataan" and "Hamlet" can be seen in the lead character's surname in "Bataan," Dane and allusion to Hamlet the Danish prince, and in the film's examination of the consequences of inaction, a central theme of "Hamlet." The author examines the career of "Bataan" screenwriter Robert Hardy Andrews. The article discusses the box office failure of several 1934-1943 Shakespeare films." [Ebsco]

Millard, Barbara C.
"Shakespeare on Film: Towards an Audience Perceived and Perceiving." Literature/Film Quarterly 5:4 (1977:Fall) 352
UC users only

Morris, Peter
Shakespeare on Film. Ottawa, Canadian Film Institute, 1972.
UCB Main PR3093 .M61
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .M6

Morris, Peter
"Shakespeare on film." (incl index of films, 1929-1971) Films in Review v 24 Mar 1973. p. 132-63

Morrison, Michael A.
John Barrymore, Shakespearean actor / Michael A. Morrison. Cambridge [England]; New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Series title: Cambridge studies in American theatre and drama 10.
UCB Main PR3112 .M67 1997

Mullin, Michael
"Shakespeare USA: The BBC Plays And American Education." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 35, No. 5, Special Issue:Teaching Shakespeare. (1984), pp. 582-589. (Berkeley users only)

Mulrooney, Jonathan.
"Rough magic in America.(Shakespeare on Film)." Shakespeare Bulletin 24.1 (Spring 2006): 29(17). (Berkeley users only)

Murphy, Andrew.
"The Book on the Screen: Shakespeare Films and Textual Culture."In: Shakespeare, film, fin de siecle Edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray; foreword by Peter Holland. pp: 10-25. New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.S485 2000

Naremore, James, ed.
"Welles/Shakespeare/film: an overview."In: Film adaptation / edited and with an introduction by James Naremore. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, c2000. Naremore, James. Rutgers depth of field series.
Main Stack PN1997.85.F55 2000

Niyogi De, Esha
"Modern Shakespeare in popular Bombay cinema: translation, subjectivity and community." Screen;Vol.XLIII nr.1 (Spring 2002); p.19-40
Two Indian adaptations of 'Hamlet': "Khoon ka khoon" (1935) and Kishore Sahu's "Hamlet" (1955)are considered for their illustration of a colonial and post-colonial translation of an imperious 'master text'.

O'Brien, Geoffrey.
"The Ghost at the Feast. (review of film adaptations and other productionsof Shakespeare) New York Review of Books v44, n2 (Feb 6, 1997):11 (6 pages).

Osborne, Laurie E.
"Clip Art: Theorizing the Shakespeare Film Clip." Shakespeare Quarterly. 53(2):227-40. 2002Summer
UC users only

Osborne, Laurie (ed. and introd.)
"Screening Shakespeare." Colby-Quarterly, 2001 Mar, 37:1.

Osborne, Laurie E.
"Mixing Media in Shakespeare: Animating Tales and Colliding Modes of Production." Post Script, vol. 17 no. 2. 1998 Winter-Spring. pp: 73-89..
UC users only

Osborne, Laurie (ed. and introd.).
"Screening Shakespeare." Colby Quarterly. 37(1). 2001 Mar

Osborne, Laurie E.
"Speculations on Shakespearean cinematic liveness.(Shakespeare ON FILM)(William Shakespeare)(Critical essay)." Shakespeare Bulletin 24.3 (Fall 2006): 49(17).
UC users only

Pearson, Roberta E.; Uricchio, William.
"How many times shall Caesar bleed insport: Shakespeare and the cultural debate about moving pictures." Screen, v. 31 (Autumn '90) p. 243-61
Also in:
The silent cinema reader / edited by Lee Grieveson and Peter Kramer. London ; New York : Routledge, 2004.
Main Stack PN1995.75.S547 2004
PFA PN1995.75.S547 2004

Pendleton, Thomas A.
"Shakespeare . . . with additional dialog." Cineaste, v. 24 no1('98) p. 62-6
UC users only
"Part of a special section on film adaptations of plays by William Shakespeare.The writer considers how Shakespeare's dialog is dealt with in film adaptations of hisplays. Shakespeare's language intimidates, and although filmmakers will cut, adapt,rearrange, reassign speeches, choose strange settings, and do all kinds of things to thetexts, they are very wary of adding their own words. In fact, they are usually moreconcerned about eliminating words, and most films cut one third or even half of the lines.However, filmmakers are somewhat less hesitant about interpolating other texts and feelrelatively free to add songs. The writer goes on to discuss the effectiveness of the dialogin several films, including Trevor Nunn's Twelfth Night, which may well be the best of thecurrent crop of Shakespeare films." [from ArtAbstracts]

Pendleton, Thomas A.
"What (?) Price (?) Shakespeare (?)." Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 135-46
UCB users only
Investigates three films using Shakespeare material and featuring Vincent Price.

Pigeon, Renee.
"'No Man's Elizabeth': The Virgin Queen in Recent Films." In: Retrovision : reinventing the past in film and fiction. Edited by Deborah Cartmell, I.Q. Hunter, and Imelda Whelehan. pp: 8-24. London; Sterling, Va.: Pluto Press, 2001. Series title: Film/fiction; v. 6.
UCB Main PN1995.9.H5 R46 2001

Pilkington, Ace G.
Screening Shakespeare from Richard II to Henry V / Ace G. Pilkington.Newark: University of Delaware Press; London; Cranbury, NJ: AssociatedUniversity Presses, c1991.
UCB Main PR3093 .P55 1991
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .P55 1991
Contents via Google Books

Prumm, Hans-Joachim.
Film-script, William Shakespeare: Eine Untersuchung derFilm-Bearbeitungen von Shakespeares Dramen am Beispiel AusgewahlterTragodien-Verfilmungen von 1945-1985 / von Hans-Joachim Prumm.Amsterdam:B.R. Gruner, 1987. Series title: Munchner Studien zur neueren englischen Literatur; Bd. 3.
UCB Main PR3093 .P71 1987

The reel Shakespeare: alternative cinema and theory
Edited by Lisa S. Starks and Courtney Lehmann. Madison [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, N.J.: Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.R44 2002

Rhu, Lawrence F.
Stanley Cavell's American dream : Shakespeare, philosophy, and Hollywood movies Fordham University Press, 2006.
MAIN: B945.C274 R48 2006
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0610/2006007880.html

Rosenthal, Daniel M.
Shakespeare on screen / Daniel Rosenthal ; foreword by Ian McKellen. London : Hamlyn, 2000.
Main Stack PR3093.R65 2000

Ross, Charles
"Underwater Women in Shakespeare Films." CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture: A WWWeb Journal, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 27 paragraphs, March 2004.

Rothwell, Kenneth S. (Kenneth Sprague)
A History of Shakespeare on Screen: A Century of Film and Television / Kenneth S. Rothwell. Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
UCB Main PR3093 .R67 1999
Contents via Google Books

Rothwell, Kenneth S. (Kenneth Sprague)
Shakespeare on Screen: An International Filmography and Videography /Kenneth S. Rothwell and Annabelle Henkin Melzer. New York: Neal-Schuman,c1990.
UCB Ref/Bib PR3093 .R68 1990
UCB Media Ctr PR3093 .R68 1990

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
How the Twentieth Century Saw the Shakespeare Film: 'Is It Shakespeare?'." Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 82-95.
UCB users only
Survey of the literature on the study of Shakespeare on film.

Rothwell, Kenneth S.
"Orson Welles: Shakespeare for the art houses." (Shakespeare in the Cinema) Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):28 (6 pages).
UC users only
"Part of a special section on film adaptations of plays by William Shakespeare. Orson Welles's film adaptations of Shakespeare's plays are discussed. Welles made and starred in three such films: Macbeth (1948), Othello (1952), and Chimes at Midnight (1966). He also undertook ambitious plans for films based on Shylock and King Lear, but neither project was realized. His Macbeth explores the tortured soul of Macbeth through the Wellesian world of skewed camera angles and brilliant decoupage, and the film's sheer nerve and energy make it impossible to ignore. In Chimes at Midnight, Welles gave his best performance as the larger-than-life yet vulnerable antihero Sir John Falstaff, and his Othello, which took three years to make because of repeated financial crises, is a work of art. In his struggle to find the best way to put Shakespeare on screen, however, Welles never quite made the transition from bohemian art house to suburban mall house." [Art Index]

Sammons, Eddie
Shakespeare : a hundred years on film Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2004.
MAIN: PR3093 .S26 2004

Shakespeare after mass media
Edited by Richard Burt. New York : Palgrave, 2002.
Main Stack PR2970.S49 2002

Shakespeares after Shakespeare : an encyclopedia of the Bard in mass media and popular culture
Edited by Richard Burt. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2007.
Main Stack PR2880.A1.S48 2007
Table of contents http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0611/2006010852.html

Shakespeare and appropriation
Edited by Christy Desmet and Robert Sawyer. London ; New York : Routledge, 1999.
Full-text available online [UC Berkeley users only]
Main Stack PR2880.A1.S52 1999

Shakespeare and the Moving Image: The Plays on Film and Television
Edited by Anthony Davies and Stanley Wells. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994.
UCB Main PR3093 .S53 1994
Contens via Google Books

Shakespeare, film, fin de siecle
Edited by Mark Thornton Burnett and Ramona Wray; foreword by Peter Holland. New York: St. Martin's Press,
Main Stack PR3093 .S485 2000

"Shakespeare in the cinema: a film directors' symposium." (Shakespeare in the Cinema)(Panel Discussion)Cineaste v24, n1 (Winter, 1998):48 (8 pages).
UC users only
A panel discussion among filmmakers who have been involved in adapting Shakespeare's plays for the cinema was conducted to gain insights into their working methods and aesthetic considerations. Participants included Sir Peter Hall ('A Midsummer Night's Dream,' 1968), Roman Polanski ('Macbeth,' 1971), Franco Zeffirelli ('Romeo and Juliet,' 1968), Baz Luhrmann ('William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet,' 1996) and Richard Loncraine ('Richard III,' 1995).

Shakespeare on Film
Edited by Robert Shaughnessy. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1998. Series title: New casebooks.
UCB Main PR3093 .S537 1998
Contens via Google Books

"Shakespeare on Film: A Selected Checklist."
Literature/Film Quarterly 4:2 (1976:Spring) 191
UC users only

Shakespeare, The Movie: Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, and Video
Edited by Lynda E. Boose, Richard Burt. London; New York: Routledge, 1997.
Main Stack PR3093.S545 1997
Contents via Google Books

Shakespeare, the movie, II : popularizing the plays on film, TV, video, and DVD / edited by Richard Burt and Lynda E. Boose. London ; New York : Routledge,
Main Stack PR3093.S543 2003

Silverstone, Catherine.
Shakespeare, trauma and contemporary performance / Catherine Silverstone. New York : Routledge, 2011.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PR3100 .S65 2011
Contents: Introduction -- "Honour the real thing?: Gregory Doran's Titus Andronicus in South Africa -- The legacy of colonisation: Don C. Selwyn's The maori Merchant of Venice and Aotearoa New Zealand -- Sexuality, trauma and community: The tempest, Philip Osment's This island's mine and gay sweatshop -- Theatres of war: Nicholas Hytner's Henry V.

Silviria, Dale
Laurence Olivier and the Art of Film Making / Dale Silviria. Rutherford [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London: Associated University Presses, c1985.
UCB Main PN2598.O55 S54 1985
UCB Moffitt PN2598.O55 S54 1985

Simmon, Scott.
"Concerning the Weary Legs of Wyatt Earp: The Classic Western according to Shakespeare." Literature/ Film Quarterly, vol. 24 no. 2. 1996. pp: 114-27.
UC users only

Skrebels, Paul.
"What's Shakespeare to Us or We to Shakespeare? An Interventionist Teaching and Learning Strategy." Readerly-Writerly Texts 2000 Spring-Winter, 8:1-2, 93-103.

Spectacular Shakespeare : critical theory and popular cinema
Edited by Courtney Lehmann and Lisa S. Starks. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; London ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.S64 2002
Contents: All our Othello: black monsters and white masks on the American screen / Marguerite Hailey Rippy -- "How very like the home life of our own dear queen": Ian McKellen's Richard III / Lisa Hopkins -- (Un)doing the book "without Verona walls": a view from the receiving end of Baz Luhrmann's William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet / Alfredo Michel Modenessi -- Cutting up characters: the erotic politics of Trevor Nunn's Twelfth night / Laurie Osborne -- The marriage of Shakespeare and Hollywood: Kenneth Branagh's Much ado about nothing / Samuel Crowl -- Shakespeare in love: romancing the author, mastering the body / Courtney Lehmann -- "Art thou base, common, and popular?": The cultural politics of Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet / Douglas Lanier -- From the cinema to the classroom: Hollywood teaches Hamlet / Elizabeth A. Deitchman -- The film's the thing: using Shakespearean film in the classroom / Annalisa Castaldo -- Afterword: Te(e)n things I hate about Girlene Shakesploitation flicks in the late 1990's, or not-so-fast times at Shakespeare high / Richard Burt.

Starks, Lisa S.
"'Remember Me': Psychoanalysis, Cinema, and the Crisis of Modernity." Shakespeare Quarterly. 53(2):181-200. 2002 Summer
UC users only

Stenberg, Doug.
"The Circle of Life and the Chain of Being: Shakespearean Motifs in The Lion King." Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 14 no. 2. 1996 Spring. pp: 36-37.

Streisand, Betsy.
"Looking for Mr. Good Bard this fall." (Shakespeare film adaptions) U.S. News & World Report v121, n19 (Nov 11, 1996):77 (1 page).
Motion picture studios have traditionally been very reluctant to try and film the works of Shakespeare, believing them to be too difficult and hard for audiences to appreciate. A new group of movies based on the Bard's work are now being produced, hoping to reverse that trend.

Styan, J. L.
Perspectives on Shakespeare in performance / J.L. Styan. New York: P. Lang, 1999. Series title: Studies in Shakespeare; vol. 11.
UCB Main PR3091 .S79 1999

Teker, Gulsen Sayin.
"Empowered by madness: Ophelia in the films of Kozintsev, Zeffirelli, and Branagh.(Grigori Kozintsev, Franco Zeffirelli, Kenneth Branagh)(Critical essay)." Literature-Film Quarterly 34.2 (April 2006): 113(7).
UC users only

Thompson, Ayanna.
"Rewriting the "Real": Popular Shakespeare in the 1990s." Journal of Popular Culture. Dec 2007. Vol. 40, Iss. 6; p. 1052 (21 pages)
(UCB users only)

Thorp, Margaret Farrand
"Shakespeare and the Movies." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 9, No. 3. (Summer, 1958), pp. 357-366.
(UCB users only)

Tibbetts, John C.
Backstage with the Bard: or, Building a Better Mousetrap." Literature-Film-Quarterly, 2001, 29:2, 147-64.
UCB users only
Looks at films that do not adapt Shakespeare so much as assimilate him into their primary texts.

Tibbetts, John.
"Breaking the Classical Barrier: Franco Zeffirelli interviewed by John Tibbetts." Literature-Film Quarterly v22, n2 (April, 1994):136 (5 pages).
UC users only
Director Franco Zeffirelli places importance on bringing opera and William Shakespeare's works to a mass audience, as in his Shakespearean films. His 1990 film of 'Hamlet' was only possible because it starred Mel Gibson, for there is great difficulty in selling Shakespeare to film studios today. Zeffirelli sees Hamlet as the first modern man, although he gave the sets a primitive medieval look with grayish colors. He sees Shakespeare's language as a challenge for accessibility to a modern audience.

Tiffany, Grace
"Not much information about Bollywood Shakespeare." (William Shakespeare in Indian cinema)(Critical Essay) Shakespeare Newsletter Winter 2002 v52 i4 p123(1)

"Tough acts." (film adaptations of William Shakespeare's plays)(Editorial)Sight and Sound v7, n2 (Feb, 1997):3 (1 page).
Filmdom is facing a current trend toward contemporary film adaptations of Shakespearean plays, which has elicited sundry reactions from the film community. While critics smirk on the merits of these adaptations relative to their justification, filmmakers as well as the fare-getters welcome the refreshing change from the cliche Hollywood formulas to verified story-telling inherent in every classic Shakespearean tale.

Transforming Shakespeare: contemporary women's re-visions in literature and performance
Edited by Marianne Novy. 1st ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999.
UCB Main PR2880.A1 T7 1999

Walker, Elsie
"Shakespeare on Film: Early Modern Texts, Postmodern Statements." Literature Compass 1 (2003)SH 035,1 -5
UC users only

Walking Shadows: Shakespeare in the National Film and Television Archive
Eited by Luke McKernan and Olwen Terris. London: British Film Institute, 1994.
UCB Main PR2880.A1 W35 1994

Watson, William Van.
"Shakespeare, Zeffirelli, and the Homosexual Gaze." (Franco Zeffirelli) (Shakespeare - Film & Television) Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n4 (Oct, 1992):308 (18 pages).
UC users only
Director Franco Zeffirelli displays a homosexual 'gaze' in much of his camera work. Often Zeffirelli's camera will focus on the bearer rather than the object of the gaze, and often the bearer will be one of his handsome leading actors such as Michael York or Leonard Whiting. In his film version of 'Taming of the Shrew' Zeffirelli balances such scenes with shots of Elizabeth Taylor's cleavage. The homosexual gaze that Zeffirelli brings to the camera is not overdone and seems tempered by his own closeted sexual politics.

Welles, Orson
Orson Welles on Shakespeare : the W.P.A. and Mercury Theatre playscripts / edited with an introduction by Richard France. New York : Greenwood Press, 1990. Contributions in drama and theatre studies ; no. 30
Main Stack PR2877.W45 1990

Welsh, James M.
"Classic demolition: why Shakespeare is not exactly 'our contemporary'; or, 'Dude, where's my hankie?'." Literature/Film Quarterly (30:3) [2002:3] , p.223-227.
UC users only

Welsh, Jim.
"Shakespeare Boom or Bust?" West Virginia University Philological Papers. 47:150-54. 2001

Welsh, James M.
"What is a "Shakespeare film," anyway?" In: The literature/film reader : issues of adaptation / edited by James M. Welsh, Peter Lev. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2007.
Main (Gardner) Stacks PN1997.85 .L516 2007

Willis, Susan
The BBC Shakespeare Plays: Making the Televised Canon / Susan Willis. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, c1991.
UCB Main PR3093 .W55 1991
UCB Moffitt PR3093 .W55 1991

Willson, Robert Frank
Shakespeare in Hollywood, 1929-1956 Madison [N.J.]: London; Cranbury, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; Associated University Presses, 2000.
UCB Main PR3093.W57 2000

Yong, Li Lan
"Returning to Naples: seeing the end in Shakespeare film adaptation." Literature/Film Quarterly; Vol.XXIX nr.2 (2001); p.128-134
UC users only
Examines the differences that cinematic reproduction makes to the endings of Shakespeare in several film versions of the plays.

Individual Plays

Anthony and Cleopatra

Deats, Sara Munson
"Shakespeare's Anamorphic Drama: A Survey of Antony and Cleopatra in Criticism, on Stage, and on Screen." In: Antony and Cleopatra : new critical essays / edited by Sara Munson Deats. New York : Routledge, 2005. Shakespeare criticism ;v. 30
Main PR2802 .A837 2005 Deats, Sara Munson, Deats, Sara Munson (ed.). (2005). Antony and Cleopatra: New Critical Essays. (pp. 1-93). New York, NY: Routledge, x, 341 pp.

As You Like It

Crowl, Samuel
"As You Like It." Shakespeare Bulletin; Spring 2008, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p97-101, 5p
The article reviews the film "As You Like It," directed by Kenneth Branagh and starring Kevin Kline, Alfred Molina and Brian Blessed.

Hatchuel, Sarah.
"Review of Kenneth Branagh's As You Like It, or All the World's a Film." Shakespeare, Dec2007, Vol. 3 Issue 3, p365-368, 4p
UC users only

Hollifield, Scott
"The Lionesses and Olive Trees of Meiji-Era Japan: A Consideration of Kenneth Branagh's As You Like It." Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, Vol III � No. 2 Spring/Summer 2008

Jays, David
"As You Like It." Sight & Sound; Oct 2007, Vol. 17 Issue 10, p48-48, 1p
UC users only

Klett, Elizabeth
"Dreaming of Orientalism in Kenneth Branagh's As You Like It." Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, Vol III � No. 2 Spring/Summer 2008

Falstaff (Chimes at Midnight): Orson Welles

Anderegg, Michael
"'Every Third Word a Lie': Rhetoric and History in Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight." Film Quarterly XL/3, Spring 87; p.18-24.
UC users only
Criticizes Orson Welles's use of Shakespeare's language and history in Chimes at Midnight. Reprinted under the same title in Beja, Perspectives on Orson Welles [F]: 210-18; incorporated into Anderegg, Orson Welles, Shakespeare, and Popular Culture

Arthur, Paul; Liebler, Naomi C.
"Kings of the road: "My Own Private Idaho" and the traversal of Welles, Shakespeare, and liminality." Post Script, 1998, Vol. 17 Issue 2, p26-38, 13p;
UC users only

Baxter, Keith.
"Filming Falstaff." [translated] Positif 378 (1992): 29-35.
Recounts the filming of Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight. Baxter, who played Prince Hal in the film, wrote this in 1982. Translated by Francois Thomas.

Bell, Robert H.
"Rereading Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight." Southwest Review; 2004, Vol. 89 Issue 4, p566-574, 9p
UC users only
Offers an appreciation of Orson Welles' Chimes at Midnight as both a flawed work and "a strong interpretation of Shakespeare."

Bell, Robert H.
"Rereading Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight." Shakespeare Newsletter 54 (2004-5): 17, 20, 22.
Offers an appreciation of Orson Welles' Chimes at Midnight as both a flawed work and "a strong interpretation of Shakespeare."

Chimes at Midnight: Orson Welles, Director
Bridget Gellert Lyons, editor. New Brunswick [N.J.]: Rutgers University Press, c1988. Series title: Rutgers films in print; [v. 11].
UCB Main PN1997 .C46437 1988
UCB Moffitt PN1997 .C46437 1988

Crowl, Samuel
"The Long Goodbye: Welles and Falstaff." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 31, No. 3. (Autumn, 1980), pp. 369-380.
(UCB users only)
Analyzes Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight as an exception to the recent trend in productions to diminish Falstaff in order to explore other values in 1 and 2 Henry IV and Henry V.

Curren-Aquino, Deborah T.
"Chimes at Midnight: Retrospectively Elegiac." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter 4, no. 1 (December 1979): 1, 7-8.
Discusses how Orson Welles makes the betrayal of a friendship between Hal and Falstaff the core of Chimes at Midnight

Dean, Leonard F.
"Comedy, Cultural Poetics, and Chimes at Midnight." Sewanee Review 102 (1994): 451-55.

Hapgood, Robert.
"Chimes at Midnight from Stage to Screen: The Art of Adaptation."Shakespeare Survey 39 (1987): 39-52.
Studies Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight against the backdrop of his earlier stage productions: the aborted Five Kings (1938), which folded before reaching the New York stage, and the Belfast/Dublin Chimes at Midnight (1960). Reprinted in Alexander, editor, The Cambridge Shakespeare Library, Volume 3: Shakespeare Performance (q.v.), and in Beja, editor, Perspectives on Orson Welles [F]: 193-209.

Hoffman, Dean A.
"'Bypaths and Indirect Crooked Ways': Mise-en-Scene in Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight." Shakespeare Bulletin: A Journal of Performance Criticism and Scholarship, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 87-112, Spring 2005.
UC users only

Howlett, Kathy M.
"Utopian revisioning of Falstaff's tavern world: Orson Welles's Chimes at midnight and Gus Van Sant's My own private Idaho." In Framing Shakespeare on film. pp. 149-77. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2000.
MAIN: PR3093 .H69 2000

Howlett, Kathy M.
"Utopian Revisioning of Falstaff's Tavern World: Orson Welles's Chimes at Midnight and Gus Van Sant's My Own Private Idaho." In: The reel Shakespeare: alternative cinema and theory Edited by Lisa S. Starks and Courtney Lehmann. pp: 165-88. Madison [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, N.J.: Associated University Presses, c2002.
Main Stack PR3093.R44 2002

McBride, Joseph
" Welles's Chimes at Midnight." Film Quarterly, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Autumn, 1969), pp. 11-20
UC users only

McLean, Andrew M.
"Orson Welles and Shakespeare: History and Consciousness in Chimes at midnight." Literature/Film Quarterly XI/3, July 83; p.197-202.
UC users only
Demonstrates how the segments in the motion picture 'Chimes at Midnight' or 'Falstaff,' directed by Orson Welles capture the essence of Shakespearean tetralogy. Details on the filming of 'Falstaff'; Setting of the film.

McLean, Andrew M.
"Orson Welles and Shakespeare: History and Consciousness in "Chimes at Midnight" Literature/Film Quarterly 11:3 (1983) 197
UC users only
(Shakespeare On Film IV Papers from the World Shakespeare Congress, 1981 Stratford-upon-Avon)

Poague, Leland.
"`Reading the Prince?: Shakespeare, Welles, and Some Aspects of Chimes at Midnight." Iowa State Journal of Research 56, no. 1 (1981): 57-65.

Rubin, Stanley S.
"Welles/Falstaff/Shakespeare/Welles: The Narrative Structure of Chimes at Midnight." Film Criticism 2, nos. 2-3 (1977-78): 66-71.
UC users only

Sylvano, John B.
"Orson Welles`s Falstaff: A Selected Bibliography." Shakespeare on Film Newsletter 2, no. 2 (April 1978): 3, 8.

Falstaff: My Own Private Idaho: Gus Van Sant

See Gay/Lesbian bibliography

Hamlet

Baker, David.
"Ophelia's Travels." In: Gender and Culture in Literature and Film East and West: Issues of Perception and Interpretation: selected conference papers / edited by Nitaya Masavisut, George Simson, Larry E. Smith. pp: 3-8. Honolulu, Hawaii: College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature, University of Hawaii: East-West Center: Distributed by University of Hawaii Press, c1994. Series title: Literary studies--East and West; v. 9.
UCB AsianAmer PN1995.9.A8 G46
UCB Main PN1995.9.A78 G46 1994

Biggs, Murray.
"'He's Going to His Mother's Closet': Hamlet and Gertrude on Screen." Shakespeare Survey v45 (Annual, 1993):53 (10 pages).
Four 20th century film adaptations of William Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' are analyzed focusing on the closet scene, which is Act 3, Scene 4. This is because it is considered the emotional center of the play, is conceivedfrom the camera's perspective and focuses on the complex love between Hamlet and Gertrude. Results show that the four productions interpreted Hamlet's character in differing but probable ways, significantly widening the scope of the debate regarding the hero's nature.

Bigliazzi, Silvia.
"'The Time Is out of Joint': Hamlet on Screen and the Crystal Image." Hamlet Studies, vol. 18 no. 1-2. 1996 Summer-Winter. pp: 105-25.

Burton, J. Anthony
"The Lady Vanishes or, the Incredible Shrinking Gertrude." In: Acts of criticism : performance matters in Shakespeare and his contemporaries : essays in honor of James P. Lusardi / edited by Paul Nelsen and June Schlueter. Madison [N.J.] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2006.
Main Stack PR3091.A27 2006

Gillespie, David
"Adapting foreign classics : Kozintsev's Shakespeare." In: Russian and Soviet film adaptations of literature, 1900-2001 : screening the word / edited by Stephen Hutchings and Anat Vernitski. London ; New York : RoutledgeCurzon, 2005.
Main Stack PN1997.85.F437 2005

Guntner, J Lawrence
"Expressionist Shakespeare: The Gade/Nielsen "Hamlet" (1920) and the History of Shakespeare on Film." Post Script - Essays in Film and the Humanities 17:2 (Winter 1997-Spring 1998) Issue p. 90-102
UC users only

Halio, Jay L.
"Three Filmed Hamlets" Literature/Film Quarterly 1:4 (1973:Fall) 316
UC users only

Kliman, Bernice W.
Hamlet: Film, Television, and Audio Performance / Bernice W. Kliman. Rutherford [N.J.]: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London; Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, c1988.
UCB Main PR2807 .K571 1988
UCB Moffitt PR2807 .K57 1988

Khoury, Yvette K.
"'To Be or Not to Be' in 'The Belly of the Whale'; A Reading of Joseph Campbell's 'Modern Hero' Hypothesis in Hamlet on Film." Literature/Film Quarterly, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 120-29, 2006
(UC Berkeley users only)

Lake, James H.
"The effects of primacy and recency upon audience response to five film versions of Shakespeare's 'Hamlet'." (Shakespeare on Film 2000)(William Shakespeare)(Critical Essay)Literature-Film Quarterly v28, n2 (April, 2000):112 (6 pages).
UCB users only
Primacy, or the first adaptation in a series, and recency, or the latest in a series, are posited as having the greatest impact on audience impression. A comparison is made between Laurence Olivier's 1947 adaptation and Kenneth Branagh's 1996 version, with Olivier's ending open to interpretation and Branagh's providing closure.

Maher, Mary Z.
"At Last, an American Hamlet for Television." [Kevin Kline and Kirk Browning] Literature-Film Quarterly v20, n4 (Oct, 1992):301 (7 pages).

Maher, Mary Z.
"Hamlet's BBC Soliloquies." Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 36, No. 4. (Winter, 1985), pp. 417-426.
(UC Berkeley users only)

Niyogi De, Esha
"Modern Shakespeare in popular Bombay cinema: translation, subjectivity and community." Screen; Vol.XLIII nr.1 (Spring 2002); p.19-40

Phage Therapy Bibliography

∞ generated and posted on 2017.06.14 ∞

Especialy English-language, phage therapy-themed publications are listed in descending-year, ascending-author order.

Please cite as:

Diana R. Alves and Stephen T. Abedon
Phage Therapy Bibliography.
publications.phage-therapy.org

See also:

Diana R. Alves and Stephen T. Abedon
An Online Phage Therapy Bibliography: Separating Under-Indexed Wheat from Overly Indexed Chaff.
2017. AIMS Microbiology 3(3):525-528.
aimspress.com/article/10.3934/microbiol.2017.3.525

Phage Therapy articles and chapters are presented in ascending-author order. Open access articles are as indicated as well as links generally, the latter mostly as call-outs.

At best this list will be updated on a yearly basis. The goal would be to have all of a year's publications available before doing this, e.g., as may be the case by, say, June of a given year. If we don't get our act together by July or so, feel free to remind us.

There will be references that are missing, typos, missing accents, or just plain things that we were unable to figure out (indicated in many cases with a "???"). Don't be shy about letting us know about these.

Otherwise, do feel free to cite us (as indicated above), like us, spread the word about the page, or, if you are an editor, then perhaps how we might draw attention to the page in publication.

But above all, use the page. There are far too many publications which don't seem to indicate an appreciation of the extent of the phage therapy literature. Remember that if you don't know your stuff, the time you are wasting is not just your own.

The beginnings of categorization of publications is presented: "Experimental" refers to phage therapy (or biocontrol) experiments, ones other than simply adding phages to bacteria found in broth or immature bacterial lawns; a "Review" (or "Brief Overview") is of phage therapy (or biocontrol) experiments; a "Commentary" states an opinion on some aspect of phage therapy (or biocontrol) and does not otherwise extensively review phage therapy (though note that there can be a fine line between commentary and review); "PT related" covers something other than simply the use of phages as antibacterial agents but nonetheless is in some way relevant to phage thearpy (or phage-mediated biocontrol); a "Monograph" is a book that to some substantial degree covers phage therapy (or biocontrol); and "Mentions" means that somewhere in an article there is, well, mention of phage therapy. A question indicates a lack of confidence in a categorization.

New references were added on May 16, 2017.

Google Scholar searches on Phage Therapy or Bacteriophage Therapy:

2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,
2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000,
1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,
1989, 1988, 1987, 1986, 1985, 1984, 1983, 1982, 1981, 1980,
1979, 1978, 1977, 1976, 1975, 1974, 1973, 1972, 1971, 1970,
1969, 1968, 1967, 1966, 1965, 1964, 1963, 1962, 1961, 1960,
1959, 1958, 1957, 1956, 1955, 1954, 1953, 1952, 1951, 1950,
1949, 1948, 1947, 1946, 1945, 1944, 1943, 1942, 1941, 1940,
1939, 1938, 1937, 1936, 1935, 1934, 1933, 1932, 1931, 1930,
1929, 1928, 1927, 1926, 1925, 1924, 1923, 1922, 1921, 1920,
1919, 1918, 1917, 1916, 1915.

Navigate this page by year:

2019, 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010,
2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000,
1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,
1989, 1988, 1987, 1986, 1985, 1984, 1983, 1982, 1981, 1980,
1979, 1978, 1977, 1976, 1975, 1974, 1973, 1972, 1971, 1970,
1969, 1968, 1967, 1966, 1965, 1964, 1963, 1962, 1961, 1960,
1959, 1958, 1957, 1956, 1955, 1954, 1953, 1952, 1951, 1950,
1949, 1948, 1947, 1946, 1945, 1944, 1943, 1942, 1941, 1940,
1939, 1938, 1937, 1936, 1935, 1934, 1933, 1932, 1931, 1930,
1929, 1928, 1927, 1926, 1925, 1924, 1923, 1922, 1921, 1920,
1919, 1918, 1917, 1916, 1915, 1914, 1913, 1912, 1911, 1910

Selected List (includes phage-mediated biological control of bacteria as well as strictly therapy and related subjects):

    2016 [return to navigation]

    The following is actually a review though not on phage therapy, but on the last page of the main text it reads more like a commentary advocating phage therapy.

    The following is an overview of a single series of already published experiments, so not quite experimental and not quite a review either.

    2015 [return to navigation]

    What is the volume and page numbers of this reference?

    What (if any?) are the page numbers?

    2014 [return to navigation]

    2013 [return to navigation]

    Is the following really a paper or instead just an abstract?

    What are the page numbers of this reference?

    What are the page numbers of this reference?

    2012 [return to navigation]

    2011 [return to navigation]

    What are the page numbers of this reference?

    What are the page numbers of this reference?

    What are the page numbers of this reference?

    What are the page numbers of this reference?

    This is a pyocin refernece (a kind of bacteriocin).

    2010 [return to navigation]

    What are the page numbers of this reference?

    This reference does not seem to be locatable via Google Scholar other than as a citation.

    2009 [return to navigation]

    What are the page numbers of this reference? Also, Google Scholar can't seem to find the reference.

    2008 [return to navigation]

    2007 [return to navigation]

    2006 [return to navigation]

    2005 [return to navigation]

    2004 [return to navigation]

    2003 [return to navigation]

    2002 [return to navigation]

    2001 [return to navigation]

    2000 [return to navigation]

    1999 [return to navigation]

    1998 [return to navigation]

    1997 [return to navigation]

    1996 [return to navigation]

    What are the complete author names associated with this reference?

    1995 [return to navigation]

    What are the complete author names associated with this reference?

    1994 [return to navigation]

    Is the volume number correct?

    1993 [return to navigation]

    1992 [return to navigation]

    1991 [return to navigation]

    1990 [return to navigation]

    1989 [return to navigation]

    What is the volume number of this reference? Also, this needs to be cited as a chapter.

    1988 [return to navigation]

    1987 [return to navigation]

    1986 [return to navigation]

    1985 [return to navigation]

    1984 [return to navigation]

    1983 [return to navigation]

    1982 [return to navigation]

    1981 [return to navigation]

    1980 [return to navigation]

    1979 [return to navigation]

    1978 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    1977 [return to navigation]

    1976 [return to navigation]

    1975 [return to navigation]

    1974 [return to navigation]

    1973 [return to navigation]

    1972 [return to navigation]

    1971 [return to navigation]

    1970 [return to navigation]

    1969 [return to navigation]

    1968 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    1967 [return to navigation]

    1966 [return to navigation]

    1965 [return to navigation]

    1964 [return to navigation]

    1963 [return to navigation]

    1962 [return to navigation]

    1960 [return to navigation]

    1959 [return to navigation]

    1958 [return to navigation]

    1957 [return to navigation]

    1956 [return to navigation]

    1955 [return to navigation]

    1954 [return to navigation]

    1953 [return to navigation]

    1952 [return to navigation]

    1951 [return to navigation]

    1950 [return to navigation]

    1949 [return to navigation]

    1948 [return to navigation]

    1947 [return to navigation]

    1946 [return to navigation]

    1945 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference? And is this really a phage therapy reference?

    1944 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    1943 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    1942 [return to navigation]

    1941 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    1940 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    1939 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    1938 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    1937 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    1936 [return to navigation]

    1935 [return to navigation]

    1934 [return to navigation]

    1933 [return to navigation]

    1932 [return to navigation]

    1931 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    1930 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    1929 [return to navigation]

    1928 [return to navigation]

    1927 [return to navigation]

    Is the following really a phage therapy reference or just a phage isolation reference?

    1926 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference, and is the year correct?

    1925 [return to navigation]

    1924 [return to navigation]

    1923 [return to navigation]

    1922 [return to navigation]

    Is the following really a phage therapy article?

    1921 [return to navigation]

    What is the last page number of this reference?

    1920 [return to navigation]

    1919 [return to navigation]

    1918 [return to navigation]

    1917 [return to navigation]

    Yes, the following is not in English.

Please cite as:

Diana R. Alves and Stephen T. Abedon
Phage Therapy Bibliography.
publications.phage-therapy.org



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